Fake Smiling At Work Makes You More Likely To Drink Heavily, Study Says | Men's Health Magazine Australia

Fake Smiling At Work Makes You More Likely To Drink Heavily, Study Says

Ever flashed a fake smile at someone at work before? We thought so. Whether it be to suppress your inner unhappiness or to avoid confrontation with that annoying coworker, we’re all guilty of flashing a fake smile here and there. And while the act of smiling (albeit, genuine or forced) is the universal indicator of positivity, it turns […]

Ever flashed a fake smile at someone at work before? We thought so. Whether it be to suppress your inner unhappiness or to avoid confrontation with that annoying coworker, we’re all guilty of flashing a fake smile here and there. And while the act of smiling (albeit, genuine or forced) is the universal indicator of positivity, it turns out that expressing forced emotions of happiness can actually elicit unintended consequences.

So, if you’re someone whose profession requires interaction with the general public, then listen up. A study conducted by the Pennsylvania State University analysed the drinking habits of 1,592 service workers including nurses, teachers, and individuals who work in the food industry.

The research demonstrated that, in fact, forcing oneself to outwardly portray a positive persona can lead to emotional and mental exhaustion, wherein individuals who work in the public sector are more likely to consume higher amounts of alcohol compared to those who don’t. 

“Faking and suppressing emotions with customers was related to drinking beyond the stress of the job or feeling negatively,” says Alicia Grandey, head professor of psychology at Penn State. “It wasn’t just feeling badly that makes them reach for a drink. Instead, the more they have to control negative emotions at work, the less they are able to control their alcohol intake after work.” 

Grandey explained that previous research had identified a correlation between service workers and excessive alcohol consumption, yet the reason for this was unascertained. She believes by suppressing emotions workers are cultivating much of their self-control and thus leaving less to regulate how much they drink.

“Smiling as part of your job sounds like a really positive thing, but doing it all day can be draining,” Grandey said. “In these jobs, there’s also often money tied to showing positive emotions and holding back negative feelings. Money gives you a motivation to override your natural tendencies, but doing it all day can be wearing.”

This article originally appeared on Marie Claire Australia

The Relationship Advice Sylvester Stallone Gave His Daughter

The Relationship Advice Sylvester Stallone Gave His Daughter

When it comes to icons of the screen, Sylvester Stallone is up there with the best. The man who made the movie training montage a prerequisite for any sporting flick, particularly those of the boxing variety, became a household name since bursting onto our screens in...

How Michael Clarke Transformed His Body In 12 Weeks

How Michael Clarke Transformed His Body In 12 Weeks

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRIS MOHEN A decade ago, when Michael Clarke became Test captain of Australia, he took control of an institution. Recently, after a milestone birthday, he resolved to take control of his own body, targeting it over 12 weeks for a transformation that...

Why The Mind Not Body Is The Key To Being A Baller

Why The Mind Not Body Is The Key To Being A Baller

There are very few poor athletes in the NBA. Athleticism or skill, often both, are a given at the elite level. But what separates the very best – MJ, LeBron, Steph and Giannis – from the rest, isn’t something you can track by measuring a player’s wingspan or vertical...

George Clooney On Turning 60 And Fatherhood In The Pandemic

George Clooney On Turning 60 And Fatherhood In The Pandemic

Few people can be likened to a fine wine that gets better with age, but for George Clooney, such a label seems fitting. This is, of course, a man who seemingly popularised the phrase “silver fox”, someone who men turn to for inspiration on fashion and grooming, and...

Recommended to you

More From