Working Far From Home Is The Key To Increased Job Satisfaction | Men's Health Magazine Australia

Working Far From Home Is The Key To Increased Job Satisfaction

Because WFH is so 2020 Scott Henderson 1 / 9 In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working […]
Because WFH is so 2020 Scott Henderson
1 / 9
In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working preferences of Aussies, 69 per cent of Australians believe working from home has had positive impacts on their work, with a whopping 90 per cent of managers finding increased productivity during the WFH phenomenon.

Which begs the question; if your occupation allows you to work from home, surely you can work from anywhere, right?

Luke Harvey

In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working preferences of Aussies, 69 per cent of Australians believe working from home has had positive impacts on their work, with a whopping 90 per cent of managers finding increased productivity during the WFH phenomenon.

Which begs the question; if your occupation allows you to work from home, surely you can work from anywhere, right?

In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working preferences of Aussies, 69 per cent of Australians believe working from home has had positive impacts on their work, with a whopping 90 per cent of managers finding increased productivity during the WFH phenomenon.

Which begs the question; if your occupation allows you to work from home, surely you can work from anywhere, right?

In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working preferences of Aussies, 69 per cent of Australians believe working from home has had positive impacts on their work, with a whopping 90 per cent of managers finding increased productivity during the WFH phenomenon.

Which begs the question; if your occupation allows you to work from home, surely you can work from anywhere, right?

In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working preferences of Aussies, 69 per cent of Australians believe working from home has had positive impacts on their work, with a whopping 90 per cent of managers finding increased productivity during the WFH phenomenon.

Which begs the question; if your occupation allows you to work from home, surely you can work from anywhere, right?

In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working preferences of Aussies, 69 per cent of Australians believe working from home has had positive impacts on their work, with a whopping 90 per cent of managers finding increased productivity during the WFH phenomenon.

Which begs the question; if your occupation allows you to work from home, surely you can work from anywhere, right?

In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working preferences of Aussies, 69 per cent of Australians believe working from home has had positive impacts on their work, with a whopping 90 per cent of managers finding increased productivity during the WFH phenomenon.

Which begs the question; if your occupation allows you to work from home, surely you can work from anywhere, right?

In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working preferences of Aussies, 69 per cent of Australians believe working from home has had positive impacts on their work, with a whopping 90 per cent of managers finding increased productivity during the WFH phenomenon.

Which begs the question; if your occupation allows you to work from home, surely you can work from anywhere, right?

In the aftermath of 2020, WFH has become an office acronym used as regularly as OOO, EOD and WTF. And whilst life shows signs of a slow return to pre-pandemic routines, our working habits may have shifted forever. According to UNSW research into the working preferences of Aussies, 69 per cent of Australians believe working from home has had positive impacts on their work, with a whopping 90 per cent of managers finding increased productivity during the WFH phenomenon.

Which begs the question; if your occupation allows you to work from home, surely you can work from anywhere, right?

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